Monthly Archives: September 2017

Contributing to pandas

Very proud to announce today that I had a pull request merged into the pandas library. In version 0.21, pandas will have a new feature: a way to read in line-delimited JSON in small pieces, which can be useful when working with large files or streams.

This is a fairly small change, technically, but a big deal for me.  Pandas is one of the most commonly used tools in the data science world. When I started at TrueAccord they bought me the book on pandas (Volume 2 coming out next month!). This was my first introduction to any programming language other than Stata, an odd proprietary language that languishes on among economists and epidemiologists. Now, writing software is a core part of my career.

Related, I highly recommend  The Success of Open Source, in which Steven Weber outlines the varied ways in which open source communities elicit and channel cooperation, and explores the complex set of motivations that leads people to contribute to open source.

What I’ve been reading lately

Rebecca Solnit, River of ShadowsSolnit is a marvelous thinker and historian who moves smoothly between well-researched historical fact and philosophical reverie. Here she traces the life of Edward Muybridge whose motion studies of animals are still familiar today. Muybridge was a first-class photographer, a true artist who also made many technical innovations. Solnit takes his collaboration with Leland Stanford as the jumping-off point for an exploration of the way technology has annihilated time and space, and develops a genealogy from those two to the California of today, dominated by Hollywood and Silicon Valley. In her telling, these two industries named for physical places are at the center of a world that, in large part because of their doing, is increasingly disconnected from the world itself.

Mary Robison, Why Did I EverA few years back I made a note to myself to read this novel. I can’t recall why, or at whose urging, but I’m glad I did. Told in over 500 short fragments, Robison is funny and poignant. I was sad to have finished this book.

Diane Coyle, GDP: A Brief but Affectionate HistoryI’ve been meaning to read this for a while, but I am, so far, disappointed. GDP is the single measure that people associate with economic health and growth, to the extent that people say “the economy grew” when they mean “GDP grew”. How the economy is measured could not be more important and Coyle lays out some of the history of how GDP developed, and some of the ways in which it is flawed. This wasn’t the right level of depth for me — took some things for granted and was disappointingly shallow elsewhere — but seems like a good starting point for a deeper read into these ideas.

Nitt Witt Ridge

Art Beal spent 61 years building a house out of found materials at Nitt Witt Ridge in Cambria, CA. He served for a time  as the town garbageman, dumping his truck directly into his own backyard and rummaging for salvageable building supplies with which he slowly built a house in the shape of his own mind. There is now little trace of the 20 feet of landfill underneath the hill. where his house rests.

Beal, born in Oakland, was a celebrated long-distance swimmer in his youth but decamped in his 20’s to Cambria, 200 miles south along the California coast. He built a small house and lived in it with “Gloria” whose life is otherwise lost to history. At some point she disappeared. He abandoned that house and began constructing his masterwork, the unfinished project of the rest of his life.

There is no place in our world for some men. Through accident of birth some men are born different and they accumulate injuries in the world as they repeatedly are rammed through holes of the wrong shape. Beal was lucky. He found a place for his energy, found a way to preserve himself in a world that has no room for difference of mind.